Inglorification of the Glorious Bastards

March 9, 2010 at 2:57 am | Posted in Cinema | 11 Comments

Note: Quentin Tarantino’s not a genius. He doesn’t even know to spell. Yes, Quentin, what kind of torture do you have in store for grammar Nazis like me?

Post-Academy whining. Okay, first and foremost, winning an award for all the work they have put into something they truly treasure and treat like their own baby is a special moment in their lives. Especially when it’s from a pretentious so-called prestigious institution. For works of more artistic merit, just submit your films to other film festivals because you’ll have no luck with the pea-brained voting members of the Oscars.

It must be the time of their lives, especially when it’s their very first award, especially to those small-time filmmakers and newcomers. You mustn’t go ruin it by setting a time limit for their speeches. You must not turn off the mike for them and play that annoying tune once they go over the limit. It’s rude, and you call yourself high-class, hmpf.

They should be allowed to bask it in. It’s the time of their lives. It’s the moment they’ve all been waiting for. And there you are, trivializing it and prioritizing the ceremony’s sponsors over them. Oscars, you wouldn’t even be a golden trophy and given around to others like freebies if it weren’t for them.

So I say, let them cry. Let them pause and let them remember it as a great moment. Let them dedicate the award to their children’s cousin’s parents’ neighbors and whoever else. It’s your moment, woman, and they ought not to take it away from you. You’re allowed to take your time, for all they care. The heartless and faceless sponsors can fucking wait. They have no dreams but that doesn’t mean they have to ruin it for everyone else.

I propose that they just entirely get rid of the tacky and mediocre presentations by those celebrities. They’re unfunny most of the time, anyways. They basically just say the same thing over and over again. They just change some stuff every year. They just read off a screen anyways. Even I could do that.

**********

And the Best Picture award every year just goes to the most sentimental, most predictable, and most crowd-pleasing film. For a second there, I actually thought they’d choose Avatar, based on their previously poor choices (The Departed? Crash? A Beautiful Mind? Lord of the Rings!?). Its jury, probably a very conservative group, never seems to choose the more controversial and less accessible ones, to avoid any heated-up debates/discussions about it. Instead, the members choose self-indulgent, saccharine, all-American tripe. They seem to have this awful preference for films that seem to have some socially relevant themes like poverty, racism, and war but that just deal with those themes in a trivial and banal manner.

The Hurt Locker? Well, it’s about fucking time that they gave the Best Picture award to a film directed by a woman (and the Best Director award to a woman), noting the fact that there have been relatively more numbers of films directed by women now than there were decades ago. I haven’t watched this myself but I do love Kathryn Bigelow’s Point Break, if that means anything. Point Break’s probably the only Keanu Reeves film where his robotic acting seems plausible enough. That, and The Matrix. It’s a good thing he’s a pretty boy. I’m getting off-topic again.

Psychological effects and the horrors of war ought to do the trick, showing it for the hell that it really is.

Sure, The Hurt Locker‘s about the current war in Iraq but again, based on what I know and have read, it doesn’t show the ugliness of it all, unlike films like The Big Red One or Come and See (Only in The Big Red One will you find a soldier who loses one of his balls in war). Knowing America and its sense of superiority and narrow-mindedness, its message is probably something along the lines of, the war is inevitable, war gives people thrills, and we are all stuck in this twisted cycle of war that there’s nothing we can really do to avoid it. Well, show what’s really happening in Iraq and, maybe, the Americans might probably have second thoughts about it, if the average American had any conscience at all.

I say, paraphrasing a quote from The Big Red One: “There are two kinds of men in this [war]: the dead, and those who are about to die.”

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11 Comments »

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  1. That was fast! πŸ˜‰ I’m so glad you took another route. I thought I was gonna get fried. Hahaha. πŸ˜‰

    As for your thoughts regarding the ceremony, I totally agree. But I’m not surprised. The whole thing’s a commercial affair, as much as it is an awards show. Like you, I’m excited to see The Hurt Locker. I remember seeing the trailer months back, and I thought, “Whoa, this sh*t is intense!”

    • Oh, did I sound like I was looking forward to watching The Hurt Locker? Haha, I am not but I am still going to give it a chance, a benefit of the doubt. Maybe, it’s not what I thought it would actually be, all-American crap :P.

      But I guess, unless it has Keanu Reeves as a surfer dude, it won’t be much as fun as Point Break. Hahaha. XD

      • LOL, hindi ba? Oh well, I think it’s worth watching. And it just wasn’t the Oscars that gave The Hurt Locker props. It did get a lot of love from other more serious award giving bodies. It can’t be that bad. πŸ˜‰

      • I dunno, there’s some ambiguity to the film’s opinion on war. I don’t like that :P. Sure, it doesn’t always have to be black-and-white but this ambiguity is probably more or less because the filmmakers want to play it safe. “Oh, we might anger the families of the people in Iraq.” “Oh, don’t want to get on the wrong side of the white supremacist patriotic idiots.” “Oh, we don’t want to sound like bloodthirsty, gun-crazy maniacs.”

        And I’m obviously anti-war, okay, a pacifist. And based on the film’s description, I’m leaning towards the assumption that the film is pro-war.

        I just created my thoughts on how I would rate the film even before watching it. πŸ˜›

      • Ikaw? Pacifist? Hahah. πŸ˜‰ I’m kidding. I am, too. I really have no idea about the plot of the movie, only that it was visually arresting and the scenes (from what I saw of the trailer) were gritty and intense. Siguro, if it was leaning towards pro war, I’d be less into it din. Pero I’ll save my judgment come the day I finally get to watch the film. Hehe. πŸ™‚

  2. IBasterd is one of my fav films. Di ko pa napanood ang HurtL. πŸ™‚

  3. Again. Feminism.

    Haha. I don’t know what to say Eriz. Seriously.

    • Hey, I only dwelled on feminism a bit. And I don’t think you have to be a feminist to think that they have ought to award a film directed by a woman or a female filmmaker ages ago. Not just for the sake of it but because there have been so many great films by women in the past.

      I also discussed my anti-war sentiments and my complaints about how they interrupt the winners’s speeches. Read it, my friend :P. Hindi mo yata binabasa ng maigi e :P.

      • Sa totoo lang, sa bandang gitna tinamad na ko. Tas pagdating sa hurt locker, di ko na tinuloy. Hahaha. :p

      • Beh, I hate you. Di na tayo bati XD.

        Am I really that uninteresting? πŸ˜› Or do you just browse through posts? It should be at least something worthy to read :(.

        Or do you always dismiss everything I say as feminist? Haha.

      • Hindi naman. I usually browse through posts, tapos babasahin ko ng buo after ko i browse. Kaso hindi kase ako makarelate. Kaya hindi ko rin alam sasabihin ko.

        Tas alam mo naman na hindi ako nagrereact ever sa feminism mo. Haha. Kahit nung nandito ka sa Pinas, quiet lang ako pag nagstart ka na sa feminism.


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